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U.S. Chuck Steaks “on Fire” at Fairwood’s Hong Kong Locations

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In recent years, fast-casual restaurant chain Fairwood has featured more U.S. grain-fed beef entrées at its Hong Kong locations. Fairwood recently concluded a joint promotion with USMEF that showcased its new “Steak on Fire” menu. The promotion was supported by the Beef Checkoff Program and the USDA Market Access Program, but received extensive backing from Fairwood in the form of print, television and point-of-purchase advertising. Poster

Fairwood considered the promotion to be an overwhelming success with consumers, citing a notable increase in the sale of U.S. chuck steak and setting the stage for another U.S. steak promotion later this summer.

Fairwood’s “Steak on Fire” television commercial can be viewed on its website. Simply find the “Steak on Fire Sizzling Plate” in the “What’s New” section. Then click directly on the steak photo to play the Fairwood television commercial featuring Mag Lam, an up-and-coming musical artist in Hong Kong. She rose to fame as the most recent winner on Hong Kong’s version of the television talent-search series “The Voice.” (NOTE: Some security settings will not allow access to the video.)

Despite being limited to boneless muscle cuts from cattle less than 30 months of age, U.S. beef exports to Hong Kong soared to new heights in 2011, reaching 50,705 metric tons (111.8 million pounds) valued at just over $237 million. Volume has slowed so far in 2012, but export value has remained steady with last year’s record pace. U.S. trade officials continue to pursue expanded access for U.S. beef and beef variety meat in Hong Kong.

“We understand that positive discussions have been taking place on expanding access, but it’s too soon to project a timeframe,” said Joel Haggard, USMEF senior vice president for the Asia Pacific region. “We’re hopeful that this will lead to what Canadian beef enjoys right now, which is essentially full access for all beef products, consistent with OIE (World Organization for Animal Health) guidelines.”

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