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Solid Week for U.S. Pork, Slow for Beef

Pork Stats

U.S. pork exports for the week of July 17-23 rebounded to 23,000 metric tons (mt), up 50 percent from the previous week but still down 1 percent from the previous four-week average. Exports increased for Japan (4,400 mt, +7 percent), and Honduras (780 mt, +153 percent and the largest in nearly 12 months). Significant volumes were also reported for several smaller markets, including Nicaragua (700 mt), Haiti (670 mt) and Guatemala (630 mt). Exports were steady for Canada (1,700 mt), down slightly for Mexico (8,000 mt, -1 percent), and trended lower to South Korea (1,400 mt, -46 percent), China (1,100 mt, -34 percent) and Colombia (848 mt, -13 percent).

Pork net sales were 22,100 mt, up 90 percent from the previous week and 8 percent above the previous four-week average. Increases for Mexico (8,700 mt, +33 percent), Canada (2,600 mt, +62 percent), Honduras (900 mt, +341 percent) and Guatemala (575 mt, +185 percent) more than offset slower sales to Japan (4,100 mt, -11 percent), Korea (700 mt, -77 percent), Colombia (574 mt, -14 percent) and China (34 mt, -94 percent). Similar to exports, large sales were reported for Nicaragua (700 mt), Haiti (680 mt) and Guatemala (575 mt).

WeeklyBeef

U.S. beef exports totaled 11,700 mt, down 8 percent from the previous week but steady with the previous four-week average. Exports were larger to Japan (4,100 mt, +20 percent) and steady to Mexico (1,500 mt), but slowed to Korea (2,400 mt, -16 percent), Canada (1,400 mt, -2 percent), Hong Kong/Vietnam (900 mt, -11 percent) and Taiwan (572 mt, -31 percent).

Beef net sales were 6,200 mt, down 39 percent from the previous week and 46 percent below the previous 4-week average. Sales were lower for all major destinations, including Japan (2,000 mt, -47 percent), Canada (1,200 mt, -7 percent), Mexico (800 mt, -41 percent), Hong Kong/Vietnam (600 mt, -21 percent), Korea (500 mt, -81 percent) and Taiwan (326 mt, -66 percent).



NOTES:

  • Source: USDA/FAS (includes exports and sales of whole muscle cuts).
  • Percent change is compared to the previous four-week average, unless otherwise noted.
  • Export is defined as an actual shipment from the U.S. to a foreign country.
  • Export sale is defined as a transaction entered into between a reporting exporter and a foreign buyer. Sales can be cancelled or adjusted in following weeks, thus “net” sales are reported as the difference between new sales and any cancelations or adjustments.