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U.S. Beef, Pork Paired with Chinese Tea at Media Reception in Shanghai

Pairing products that have roots in American and Chinese cultures, USMEF hosted a media reception in Shanghai that featured U.S. beef and pork served with Chinese tea. Funded by the Iowa Corn Growers Association/Iowa Corn Promotion Board and the National Pork Board, the reception gave 30 reporters and bloggers in China an opportunity to taste a variety of dishes made with U.S. red meat.

Chinese reporters snap photos before sampling U.S. beef and pork paired with Chinese tea at a USMEF media reception in Shanghai

Chinese reporters snap photos before sampling U.S. beef and pork paired with Chinese tea at a USMEF media reception in Shanghai

An example of media coverage of the U.S. red meat and Chinese tea media event can be seen here.

“The media invited to the pairing were quite familiar with tea, of course, but this was a chance for them to experience the quality of U.S. meat prepared in different cooking styles,” said Ming Liang, USMEF marketing director in China. “Our plan was to have them share the experience with their readers and viewers and generate interest among consumers.”

The menu included sweet and sour crispy U.S. pork CT butt, pork shank and pork rib soup. U.S. beef dishes included Prime short ribs mixed with scallion oil and Sichuan pepper, Prime striploin with morel sauce and dumplings stuffed with tenderloin.

“China is the birthplace of tea culture, and the U.S. is a leader in livestock and red meat production, a country rich in natural resources that produces quality meat,” said Liang. “The reporters and bloggers wondered what kind of energy would be created when American red meat cuts meet Chinese tea. The reaction by those who participated shows that it is a very effective pairing and we expect to conduct more of these types of activities to promote U.S. beef and pork to Chinese consumers.”

A poster promoting the media reception organized by USMEF

A poster promoting the media reception organized by USMEF

A Chinese-style lunch included U.S. beef and pork in appetizers, soups and main courses served with three different kinds of tea prepared by Shanghai tea artists.