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Net Sales Rebound for U.S. Beef; Other Results Lower

Chart comparing U.S. weekly beef imports from January 2013 through December 2014 and the five year average import in metric tons

U.S. beef exports for the week of Nov. 7-13 totaled 12,900 metric tons (mt), down 4 percent from the previous four-week average. Larger volumes for Japan (3,700 mt, +3 percent), Canada (1,100 mt, +6 percent) and Taiwan (730 mt, +20 percent) and steady exports to Mexico (1,600 mt) were offset by lower volumes to Hong Kong (2,600 mt, -19 percent) and South Korea (2,200 mt, -12 percent).

Chart comparing U.S. weekly beef net export sales from January 2013 through December 2014 and the five year average export in metric tons

Beef net sales rebounded to 13,500 mt, up 26 percent from the previous four-week average, driven by large volumes booked for Hong Kong (7,400 mt, +335 percent). Net sales were also larger for Japan (2,000 mt, +6 percent), Canada (1,300 mt, +30 percent) and Mexico (1,100 mt, +11 percent), but slowed for Korea (1,200 mt, -56 percent) and Taiwan (150 MT, -78 percent). Net sales for delivery in 2015 were reported for Hong Kong (3,000 mt), Korea (300 mt) and Japan (300 mt).

U.S. pork exports totaled 15,600 mt, down 21 percent from the previous four-week average. Exports were lower for most major destinations, including Mexico (4,800 mt, -23 percent), Japan (3,200 mt, -8 percent), Korea (3,000 mt, -9 percent), Canada (1,500 mt, -27 percent), Hong Kong (900 mt, -30 percent) and China (430 mt, -58 percent).

Pork net sales were 14,200 mt, down 24 percent from the previous four-week average, despite larger sales for Mexico (5,600 mt, +18 percent) and Japan (4,000 mt, +14 percent). These results were offset by lower sales to Korea (1,300 mt, -68 percent), Canada (1,200 mt, -42 percent) and Hong Kong (600 mt, -43 percent). Negative net sales were reported for China (-36 mt). Net sales for 2015 delivery totaled 1,300 mt, led by Korea (700 mt) and Australia (400 mt).



NOTES:

  • Source: USDA/FAS (includes exports and sales of whole muscle cuts).
  • Percent change is compared to the previous four-week average, unless otherwise noted.
  • Export is defined as an actual shipment from the U.S. to a foreign country.
  • Export sale is defined as a transaction entered into between a reporting exporter and a foreign buyer. Sales can be cancelled or adjusted in following weeks, thus “net” sales are reported as the difference between new sales and any cancelations or adjustments.